Americana Gospel Series

March 16, 2019 - Coming Soon the second in the series of our music venue's we are presenting:  "Andrew Adkins" - at 7:00 pm.  We are also having a Pot Luck dinner at 6:00 pm prior to the concert, come and join us.

After seven years of fronting the popular Appalachian Stompgrass band The Wild Rumpus at countless festivals, concerts and clubs including Merlefest, Bristol Rhythm and Roots, and the AMA (American Music Association) as well as writing nearly all of the songs for their 3 studio albums, Andrew has now firmly established his own voice with the release of his 4th solo album. “Who I Am” on Mountain Soul Records.

Produced by Mountain Stage musical director Ron Sowell, recorded by virtuoso guitarist and engineer Bud Carroll and featuring an all star line up on West Virginia musicians, the album showcases Andrew’s wry insightful songwriting and his soulful authentic voice.

Andrew is not only a talented singer songwriter, he is held in high regard as performer by his peers. Often accompanied by his close friend, bass player and long time collaborator Clint Lewis, his performances leave a lasting impression. Here’s what Amanda Platt of the Honey Cutters had to say. “His onstage presence is the perfect mix of humor and humility, putting his audience at ease and drawing them into a songs-cape that originates in the Mountains of West Virginia and stretches to include the emotions and experiences that people of every corner of the country can relate to”.

And this from fellow West Virginian Tim O’Brien -”Andrew brings a likeable everyman to his live performances….his music and the stories he tells us are honest and real. Andrew reminds us that we’re all in this together”.


October 20, 2018 - The Reaching New People Committee is proud to announce the first in an Americana Gospel Series - kicking off October 20, 2018 at 7:00 pm with "The Sycomores" hailing from Boone County they just recently released their first album, "Traveling Mercies" . You may go their website to listen to their new album. Below is an excerpt from their own website http://thesycomores.com/.

The Sycomores’ roots run deep in gospel music. Growing up, Jessica Kirk and Zack Harold’s families both had southern gospel groups that traveled across West Virginia and its surrounding states. When they started playing music together in 2014, they quickly realized they not only shared similar backgrounds, but also had similar ideas about how to approach faith-based music.
The two started writing songs together, combining traditional themes of Christian music with the sounds of country, bluegrass, folk, and rock music. They invited Josh Holstein, a multi-instrumentalist who plays in their church and has recorded several bluegrass gospel albums of his own, and Richard Harold, Zack’s dad and the group’s pastor, to join the band and dubbed their group The Sycomores.
About Traveling Mercy

“Traveling Mercy” the debut album from The Sycomores, can be best described as Americana gospel. The music is heavily influenced by the hymns and southern gospel sounds the band grew up with blended with the country, rock, folk, and bluegrass music that populates their respective record collections.
The title track, featuring West Virginia Public Broadcasting’s “Mountain Stage” drummer Ammed Solomon, debuted on WTSQ’s “Musician’s Edition” in November 2017. Co-host Roger Rabalais asked the band “has Steve Earle ever heard this song?” — a testament to the album’s wide range of musical influences. The songs are delivered with the sincerity and old-time conviction custom to traditional gospel music, and uniquely crafted to achieve diverse appeal.
The Americana influence can be heard on tracks like “Mary Magdalene’s Song” and the band’s haunting arrangement of the gospel standard “My God is Real.” Other tracks like “Out of Egypt” showcase a strong rhythm and blues influence, while “Over and Under” enjoys a traditional country flare. But it’s Kirk and Harold’s lyrics that make The Sycomores’ music truly stand apart, offering honest looks at life and faith, and reinterpreting familiar Bible stories from new perspectives.
Comments